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Research as Development

by Salla Sariola & Bob Simpson Cornell University Press (March 15, 2019)

In Research as Development, Salla Sariola and Bob Simpson show how international collaboration operates in a setting that is typically portrayed as "resource-poor" and "scientifically lagging." Based on their...


The Sober Revolution

by Joseph Bohling Cornell University Press (December 15, 2018)

Burgundy, Bordeaux, Champagne. The names of these and other French wine regions bring to mind time-honored agricultural and vinicultural practices. Yet the link between wine and place, in French known as terroir,...


Smoking under the Tsars

by Tricia Starks Cornell University Press (September 15, 2018)

Approaching tobacco from the perspective of users, producers, and objectors, Smoking under the Tsars provides an unparalleled view of Russia’s early adoption of smoking. Tricia Starks introduces us to the...


Decadent Genealogies

by Barbara Spackman Cornell University Press (February 15, 2018)

Barbara Spackman here examines the ways in which decadent writers adopted the language of physiological illness and alteration as a figure for psychic otherness. By means of an ideological and rhetorical analysis...


Civilization and Disease

by Henry E. Sigerist & Elizabeth Fee Cornell University Press (July 15, 2018)

Originally published in 1943, Civilization and Disease was based on a series of lectures that the medical historian Henry E. Sigerist delivered at Cornell University in 1940. Now back in print, the book is a...


"The Hour of Eugenics"

by Nancy Leys Stepan Cornell University Press (November 14, 1996)

Eugenics was a term coined in 1883 to name the scientific and social theory which advocated "race improvement" through selective human breeding. In Europe and the United States the eugenics movement found many...


Governing Habits

by Eugene Raikhel Cornell University Press (October 19, 2016)

Critics of narcology—as addiction medicine is called in Russia—decry it as being "backward," hopelessly behind contemporary global medical practices in relation to addiction and substance abuse, and assume...


Weill Cornell Medicine

by Jennifer Moon, Antonio M. Gotto & Laurie H. Glimcher Cornell University Press (March 18, 2016)

Weill Cornell Medicine is a story of continuity and transformation. Throughout its colorful history, Cornell's medical school has been a leader in education, patient care, and research—from its founding as...


Under the Strain of Color

by Gabriel N. Mendes Cornell University Press (August 18, 2015)

In Under the Strain of Color, Gabriel N. Mendes recaptures the history of a largely forgotten New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship....


Walking Corpses

by Timothy S. Miller & John W. Nesbitt Cornell University Press (March 19, 2014)

Leprosy has afflicted humans for thousands of years. It wasn’t until the twelfth century, however, that the dreaded disease entered the collective psyche of Western society, thanks to a frightening epidemic...


The Viral Network

by Theresa MacPhail Cornell University Press (November 13, 2014)

In The Viral Network, Theresa MacPhail examines our collective fascination with and fear of viruses through the lens of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. In April 2009, a novel strain of H1N1 influenza virus resulting...


The contagious city

by Simon Finger Cornell University Press (May 03, 2012)

By the time William Penn was planning the colony that would come to be called Pennsylvania, with Philadelphia at its heart, Europeans on both sides of the ocean had long experience with the hazards of city life,...


Black Lung

by Alan Derickson Cornell University Press (April 11, 2014)

In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades after methods of prevention were known, hundreds of thousands of American miners suffered and...


Scrambling for Africa

by Johanna Tayloe Crane Cornell University Press

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa were once dismissed by Western experts as being too poor and chaotic to benefit from the antiretroviral drugs that transformed the AIDS epidemic in the United States and Europe....


The World Health Organization between north and south

by Nitsan Chorev Cornell University Press

Since 1948, the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched numerous programs aimed at improving health conditions around the globe, ranging from efforts to eradicate smallpox to education programs about the...


Embryo Politics

by Thomas Banchoff Cornell University Press

Since the first fertilization of a human egg in the laboratory in 1968, scientific and technological breakthroughs have raised ethical dilemmas and generated policy controversies on both sides of the Atlantic....