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Ideas of Order

by Neil L. Rudenstine Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 18, 2014)

Shakespeare's sonnets are the greatest single work of lyric poetry in English, as passionate and daring as any love poems we may ever encounter, and yet, they are often misunderstood. Ideas of Order: A Close...


A Susan Sontag Reader

by Susan Sontag Farrar, Straus and Giroux (September 09, 2014)

Susan Sontag occupies a special place in Modern American letters. She has become our most important critic, while her brilliant novels and short fiction are, at long last, getting the recognition they deserve....


The Sounds of Poetry

by Robert Pinsky Farrar, Straus and Giroux (August 19, 2014)

The Poet Laureate's clear and entertaining account of how poetry works.

"Poetry is a vocal, which is to say a bodily, art," Robert Pinsky declares in The Sounds of Poetry. "The medium of poetry is the human body:...


The Shelf: From LEQ to LES: Adventures in Extreme Reading

by Phyllis Rose Farrar, Straus and Giroux (May 13, 2014)

Phyllis Rose embarks on a grand literary experiment—to read her way through a random shelf of library books, LEQ–LES

Can you have an Extreme Adventure in a library? Phyllis Rose casts herself into the wilds...


American Smoke

by Iain Sinclair Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 15, 2014)

The visionary writer Iain Sinclair turns his sights to the Beat Generation in America in his most epic journey yet

"How best to describe Iain Sinclair?" asks Robert Macfarlane in The Guardian. "A literary mud-larker...


The Redress of Poetry

by Seamus Heaney Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 13, 2014)

Heaney's ten lectures as Professor of Poetry at Oxford, collected here in The Redress of Poetry, explore the poetry of a wide range of writers, from Christopher Marlowe to John Clare to Oscar Wilde. Whether...


Crediting Poetry

by Seamus Heaney Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 13, 2014)

Seamus Heaney's Nobel Lecture, captured here in Crediting Poetry, is a powerful defense of poetry as "the ship and the anchor" of our spirit within an ocean of violent, divisive politics and "world-sorrow."...


The White Goddess

by Robert Graves & Grevel Lindop Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 08, 2013)

The White Goddess is perhaps the finest of Robert Graves's works on the psychological and mythological sources of poetry. In this tapestry of poetic and religious scholarship, Graves explores the stories behind...


The Kraus Project

by Jonathan Franzen & Karl Kraus Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 01, 2013)

A great American writer's confrontation with a great European critic—a personal and intellectual awakening

A hundred years ago, the Viennese satirist Karl Kraus was among the most penetrating and farsighted...


Reading Myself and Others

by Philip Roth Farrar, Straus and Giroux (July 02, 2013)

The interviews, essays, and articles collected here span a quarter century of Philip Roth's distinguished career and "reveal [a] preoccupation with the relationship between the written and the unwritten world."...


Horace and Me

by Harry Eyres Farrar, Straus and Giroux (June 04, 2013)

A wise and witty revival of the Roman poet who taught us how to carpe diem

What is the value of the durable at a time when the new is paramount? How do we fill the void created by the excesses of a superficial...


Miss Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins

by Theodore M. Bernstein Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 01, 1971)

Once you recall that Miss Thistlebottom was your elementary-school teacher who laid down all manner of taboos concerning the use of language, you will have an idea of what this book is about. In no sense permissive...


The Missing Ink

by Philip Hensher Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 27, 2012)

When Philip Hensher realized that he didn't know what a close friend's handwriting looked like ("bold or crabbed, sloping or upright, italic or rounded, elegant or slapdash"), he felt that something essential...


The Situation and the Story

by Vivian Gornick Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 11, 2002)

A guide to the art of personal writing, by the author of Fierce Attachments and The End of the Novel of Love

All narrative writing must pull from the raw material of life a tale that will shape experience, transform...


Touchstones

by Mario Vargas Llosa & John King Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 18, 2011)

One of Latin America's most garlanded novelists—and the recipient of the 2010 Nobel Prize in Literature—Mario Vargas Llosa is also an acute and wide-ranging cultural critic and an acerbic political commentator....


Where the Stress Falls

by Susan Sontag Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 09, 2002)

Susan Sontag has said that her earliest idea of what a writer should be was "someone who is interested in everything." Thirty-five years after her first collection of essays, the now classic Against Interpretation...


The End of the Poem

by Paul Muldoon Farrar, Straus and Giroux (August 21, 2007)

In The End of the Poem, Paul Muldoon, "the most significant English-language poet born since the Second World War" (The Times Literary Supplement), presents engaging, rigorous, and insightful explorations of...


Ex Libris

by Anne Fadiman Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 01, 2011)

Anne Fadiman is--by her own admission--the sort of person who learned about sex from her father's copy of Fanny Hill, whose husband buys her 19 pounds of dusty books for her birthday, and who once found herself...


Digressions on Some Poems by Frank O'Hara

by Joe LeSueur Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 21, 2004)

An unprecedented eyewitness account of the New York School, as seen between the lines of O'Hara's poetry

Joe LeSueur lived with Frank O'Hara from 1955 until 1965, the years when O'Hara wrote his greatest poems,...


Who Owns History?

by Eric Foner Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 16, 2003)

A thought-provoking new book from one of America's finest historians

"History," wrote James Baldwin, "does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes...


Dante in Love

by A. N. Wilson Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 25, 2011)

For William Butler Yeats, Dante Alighieri was "the chief imagination of Christendom." For T. S. Eliot, he was of supreme importance, both as poet and philosopher. Coleridge championed his introduction to an...


The Gutenberg Elegies

by Sven Birkerts Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 14, 2006)

"[A] THOUGHTFUL AND HEARTFELT BOOK...A literary cri de coeur--a lament for literature and everything implicit in it."

--The Washington Post

In our zeal to embrace the wonders of the electronic age, are we sacrificing...


At the Same Time

by Susan Sontag, Anne Jump, Paolo Dilonardo & David Rieff Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 06, 2007)

"A writer is someone who pays attention to the world," Susan Sontag said in her 2003 acceptance speech for the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, and no one exemplified this definition more than she. Sontag's...


In Praise of Reading and Fiction

by Mario Vargas Llosa & Edith Grossman Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 12, 2011)

On December 7, 2010, Mario Vargas Llosa was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. His Nobel lLecture is a resounding tribute to fiction's power to inspire readers to greater ambition, to dissent, and to political...


Making Waves

National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism 1997

by Mario Vargas Llosa & John King Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 18, 2011)

Spanning thirty years of writing, Making Waves traces the development of Mario Vargas Llosa's thinking on politics and culture, and shows the breadth of his interests and passions. Featured here are astute meditations...


The Right Stuff

by Tom Wolfe Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 04, 2008)

From "America's nerviest journalist" (Newsweek)--a breath-taking epic, a magnificent adventure story, and an investigation into the true heroism and courage of the first Americans to conquer space. "Tom Wolfe...


The Painted Word

by Tom Wolfe Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 14, 2008)

"America's nerviest journalist" (Newsweek) trains his satirical eye on Modern Art in this "masterpiece" (The Washington Post)

Wolfe's style has never been more dazzling, his wit never more keen. He addresses...


How Fiction Works

by James Wood Farrar, Straus and Giroux (July 22, 2008)

What makes a story a story? What is style? What's the connection between realism and real life? These are some of the questions James Wood answers in How Fiction Works, the first book-length essay by the preeminent...


Concerning E. M. Forster

by Frank Kermode Farrar, Straus and Giroux (February 15, 2010)

A major reassessment of the great English novelist

This impressive new book by the celebrated British critic Frank Kermode examines hitherto neglected aspects of the novelist E. M. Forster's life and work. Kermode...


Postmodern Pooh

by Frederick Crews Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 01, 2011)

A sequel of sorts to the classic (and bestselling) sendup of literary criticism, The Pooh Perplex

Thirty-seven years ago, a slim parody of academic literary criticism called The Pooh Perplex became a surprise...


Writing in the Dark, Dancing in The New Yorker

by Arlene Croce Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 30, 2003)

The best of America's best writer on dance

"Theoretically, I am ready to go to anything-once. If it moves, I'm interested; if it moves to music, I'm in love."

From 1973 until 1996 Arlene Croce was The New Yorker's...


Metro Stop Dostoevsky

by Ingrid Bengis Farrar, Straus and Giroux (May 14, 2003)

A Russian American writer catapults herself into the maelstrom of Russian life at a time of seismic change for both

The daughter of Russian émigrés, Ingrid Bengis grew up wondering whether she was American...


The Purple Decades

by Tom Wolfe & Joe David Bellamy Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 01, 1982)

Tom Wolfe's The Purple Decades brings together the author's own selections from his list of critically acclaimed publications, including the complete text of Mau-Mauing and the Flak Catchers, his account of...


Mauve Gloves and Madmen, Clutter and Vine

by Tom Wolfe Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 01, 1988)

"When are the 1970s going to begin?" ran the joke during the Presidential campaign of 1976. With his own patented combination of serious journalism and dazzling comedy, Tom Wolfe met the question head-on in...


Camp Austen

by Ted Scheinman Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 06, 2018)

A raucous tour through the world of Mr. Darcy imitations, tailored gowns, and tipsy ballroom dancing

The son of a devoted Jane Austen scholar, Ted Scheinman spent his childhood summers eating Yorkshire pudding,...


Cartoon County

by Cullen Murphy Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 21, 2017)

A poignant history of the cartoonists and illustrators from the Connecticut School

For a period of about fifty years, right in the middle of the American Century, many of the the nation’s top comic-strip cartoonists,...


Housman Country

by Peter Parker Farrar, Straus and Giroux (June 20, 2017)

A New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice and Nominated for the 2017 PEN/Bograd Weld Prize for Biography

A captivating exploration of A. E. Housman and the influence of his particular brand of Englishness

A....


The Songs We Know Best

by Karin Roffman Farrar, Straus and Giroux (June 13, 2017)

The first biography of an American master

The Songs We Know Best, the first comprehensive biography of the early life of John Ashbery—the winner of nearly every major American literary award—reveals the unusual...


Organ Grinder

by Alan Fishbone Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 18, 2017)

A freewheeling essay on mortality and freedom at the intersection of ancient philosophy and biker culture

After my accident, I thought I was done with bikes. Until a few years ago—I was lying in bed having...


The Novel of the Century

by David Bellos Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 21, 2017)

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

Winner of the American Library in Paris Book Award, 2017

Les Misérables is among the most popular and enduring novels ever written. Like Inspector Javert’s dogged...


Where Have You Been?

by Michael Hofmann Farrar, Straus and Giroux (December 02, 2014)

An adventure with a roving genius of literary criticism

Michael Hofmann—poet, translator, and intellectual vagabond—has established himself as one of the keenest critics of contemporary literature. Safely...


A Ted Hughes Bestiary

by Ted Hughes & Alice Oswald Farrar, Straus and Giroux (July 12, 2016)

“Ted Hughes was a great man and a great poet because of his wholeness and his simplicity and his unfaltering truth to his own sense of the world.” —Seamus Heaney

Originally, the medieval bestiary, or book...


Young Eliot

by Robert Crawford Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 07, 2015)

A groundbreaking new biography of one of the twentieth century's most important poets

On the fiftieth anniversary of the death of T. S. Eliot, the award-winning biographer Robert Crawford presents us with the...


The Secret Life of the American Musical

by Jack Viertel Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 01, 2016)

A New York Times Bestseller

For almost a century, Americans have been losing their hearts and losing their minds in an insatiable love affair with the American musical. It often begins in childhood in a darkened...


Naming Thy Name

by Elaine Scarry Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 29, 2016)

A fascinating case for the identity of Shakespeare’s beautiful young man

SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS ARE indisputably the most enigmatic and enduring love poems written in English. They also may be the most often...


Betjeman

by A. N. Wilson Farrar, Straus and Giroux (May 05, 2015)

John Betjeman was by far the most popular poet of the twentieth century; his collected poems sold more than two million copies. As poet laureate of England, he became a national icon, but behind the public man...


American Philosophy

by John Kaag Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 11, 2016)

The epic wisdom contained in a lost library helps the author turn his life around

John Kaag is a dispirited young philosopher at sea in his marriage and his career when he stumbles upon West Wind, a ruin of an...


Shakespeare in Swahililand

by Edward Wilson-Lee, PhD Farrar, Straus and Giroux (September 13, 2016)

An exploration of Shakespeare as a global poet

Shakespeare in Swahililand tells the unexpected literary history of Shakespeare’s influence in East Africa. Beginning with Victorian-era expeditions in which Shakespeare’s...


The Hatred of Poetry

by Ben Lerner Farrar, Straus and Giroux (June 07, 2016)

No art has been denounced as often as poetry. It's even bemoaned by poets: "I, too, dislike it," wrote Marianne Moore. "Many more people agree they hate poetry," Ben Lerner writes, "than can agree what poetry...


The Georgics of Virgil

by David Ferry Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 10, 2015)

John Dryden called Virgil's Georgics, written between 37 and 30 B.C.E., "the best poem by the best poet." The poem, newly translated by the poet and translator David Ferry, is one of the great songs, maybe the...