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Results : 1 - 32 of 32 Sorted by : 

José Antonio Primo de Rivera

by Joan Maria Thomàs Berghahn Books (May 01, 2019)

There are few individuals in modern Spanish history that have been as thoroughly mythologized as José Antonio Primo de Rivera, a leading figure in the Spanish Civil War who was executed by the Republicans...


Names and Naming in Early Modern Germany

by Marjorie Elizabeth Plummer & Joel F. Harrington Berghahn Books (May 01, 2019)

Throughout the many political and social upheavals of the early modern era, names were words to conjure by, articulating significant historical trends and helping individuals and societies make sense of often...


The Spy in Moscow Station

by Eric Haseltine & General Michael V. Hayden St. Martin's Press (April 30, 2019)

The thrilling, true story of the race to find a leak in the United States Embassy in Moscow—before more American assets are rounded up and killed.

Foreword by Gen. Michael V. Hayden (Retd.), Former Director...


Gendering Post-1945 German History

by Karen Hagemann, Donna Harsch & Friederike Brühöfener Berghahn Books (April 01, 2019)

For as much as "entanglement" has become a keyword in recent German history scholarship, entangled studies of the postwar era have largely limited their scope to politics and economics across the two Germanys...


Planning Labour

by Alina-Sandra Cucu Berghahn Books (April 01, 2019)

Impoverished, indebted, and underdeveloped at the close of World War II, Romania underwent dramatic changes as part of its transition to a centrally planned economy. Like the Soviet Union, it pursued a policy...


The Invincibles

by Shane Kenna, Liz Gillis & Ruan O'Donnell The O'Brien Press (February 25, 2019)

‘Britain in Ireland is a beast exceeding terrible; his feet and claws are of iron,’ The Invincibles

In an Ireland still reeling from years of famine, with tenant farmers being evicted and left to starve for...


The Canaris Conspiracy

by Roger Manvell & Heinrich Fraenkel Skyhorse (March 26, 2019)

July 20, 1944. Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg carried a time bomb in a briefcase into a conference with Adolf Hitler. After wedging the briefcase directly in front of Hitler under a table, Stauffenberg took...


Northumbria

by Robert Colls Phillimore & Co Ltd (February 01, 2019)

This is a book about both the ancient Anglian kingdom of Northumbria, which stretched from the Humber to the Scottish border, and the ways in which the idea of being a Northumbrian, or a northerner, or someone...


The Story of the Fens

by Frank Meeres Phillimore & Co Ltd (January 02, 2019)

Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk, as well as Peterborough City Council, all lay claim to a part of the Fens. Since Roman times, man has increased the land mass in this area by one third of the...


The Little History of Kent

by Susan McGowan The History Press (March 01, 2019)

Kent has been the Gateway to Britain since prehistoric man first set foot on our soil, and its people have repelled invaders like Julius Ceasar, the Vikings and William I, while welcoming migrants from countries...


The Little History of Oxfordshire

by Paul Sullivan The History Press (February 01, 2019)

There is nothing ‘little’ about the history of Oxfordshire – with its close links to royalty, government and academia, it has taken a front-seat on the rollercoaster of English history. However, this small...


Empire and Belonging in the Eurasian Borderlands

by Krista A. Goff & Lewis H. Siegelbaum Cornell University Press (April 15, 2019)

Empire and Belonging in the Eurasian Borderlands engages with the evolving historiography around the concept of belonging in the Russian and Ottoman empires. The contributors to this book argue that the popular...


Negotiating the Secular and the Religious in the German Empire

by Rebekka Habermas Berghahn Books (March 01, 2019)

With its rapid industrialization, modernization, and gradual democratization, Imperial Germany has typically been understood in secular terms. However, religion and religious actors actually played crucial...


Beyond the Border

by Tobias Haimin Wung-Sung Berghahn Books (March 01, 2019)

In the nineteenth century, the hotly disputed border region between Denmark and Germany was the focus of an intricate conflict that complicates questions of ethnic and national identity even today. Beyond the...


Iron, Fire and Ice

by Ed West Skyhorse (April 09, 2019)

A young pretender raises an army to take the throne. Learning of his father’s death, the adolescent, dashing and charismatic and descended from the old kings of the North, vows to avenge him. He is supported...


The Bormann Brotherhood

by William Stevenson Skyhorse (May 07, 2019)

While the flames of World War II still raged, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin issued a warning to the Nazi leaders. Those responsible for the torture and murder of millions of innocent and defenseless civilians...


Making Space for the Dead

by Erin-Marie Legacey Cornell University Press (April 15, 2019)

The dead of Paris, before the French Revolution, were most often consigned to mass graveyards that contemporaries described as terrible and terrifying, emitting "putrid miasmas" that were a threat to both health...


Rule Britannia

by Danny Dorling & Sally Tomlinson Biteback Publishing (January 15, 2019)

Books on Brexit explaining how and why parts of Britain voted to leave the European Union are falling hot off the press. Some promise the full story of the political manoeuvring that got us to this point, others...


Plots against Russia

by Eliot Borenstein Cornell University Press (April 15, 2019)

In this original and timely assessment of cultural expressions of paranoia in contemporary Russia, Eliot Borenstein samples popular fiction, movies, television shows, public political pronouncements, internet...


Rampart Nations

by Liliya Berezhnaya & Heidi Hein-Kircher Berghahn Books (February 01, 2019)

The “bulwark” or antemurale myth—whereby a region is imagined as a defensive barrier against a dangerous Other—has been a persistent strand in the development of Eastern European nationalisms. While...


Henry VIII and the Reformation Parliament

by John Patrick Coby Reacting Consortium Press (March 01, 2019)

Henry VIII and the Reformation Parliament transforms students into English lords and commoners during the tumultuous years of 1529 to 1536. Cardinal Wolsey has just been dismissed as lord chancellor for failing...


France and the American Civil War

by Stève Sainlaude, Jessica Edwards & Don H. Doyle The University of North Carolina Press (February 05, 2019)

France's involvement in the American Civil War was critical to its unfolding, but the details of the European power's role remain little understood. Here, Steve Sainlaude offers the first comprehensive history...


The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books

by Edward Wilson-Lee Scribner (March 12, 2019)

Named a Best Book of the Year by: * Financial Times * New Statesman * History Today * The Spectator *

“Like a Renaissance wonder cabinet, full of surprises and opening up into a lost world.” —Stephen Greenblatt...


Ghosts in Enlightenment Scotland

by Martha McGill Boydell Press (January 18, 2019)

Scotland is famed for being a haunted nation, "whare ghaists and houlets nightly cry". Medieval Scots told stories of restless souls and walking corpses, but after the 1560 Reformation, witches and demons became...


The Changing Meanings of the Welfare State

by Nils Edling Berghahn Books (January 01, 2019)

In discussions of economics, governance, and society in the Nordic countries, “the welfare state” is a well-worn analytical concept. However, there has been much less scholarly energy devoted to historicizing...


Empire of Friends

by Rachel Applebaum Cornell University Press (April 15, 2019)

The familiar story of Soviet power in Cold War Eastern Europe focuses on political repression and military force. But in Empire of Friends, Rachel Applebaum shows how the Soviet Union simultaneously promoted...


The Moral Witness

by Carolyn J. Dean Cornell University Press (April 15, 2019)

The Moral Witness is the first cultural history of the "witness to genocide" in the West. Carolyn J. Dean shows how the witness became a protagonist of twentieth-century moral culture by tracing the emergence...


The Little Book of Cork Harbour

by Kieran McCarthy THP Ireland (January 02, 2019)

Cork Harbour, the second largest natural harbour in the world, is an historical wonder, surrounded by villages, forts, towers and churches, all of which combine to tell the colourful story of Ireland’s largest...


The Scholems

by Jay Howard Geller Cornell University Press (March 15, 2019)

The evocative and riveting stories of four brothers—Gershom the Zionist, Werner the Communist, Reinhold the nationalist, and Erich the liberal—weave together in The Scholems, a biography of an eminent middle-class...


Mass Violence and the Self

by Howard G. Brown Cornell University Press (January 15, 2019)

Mass Violence and the Self explores the earliest visual and textual depictions of personal suffering caused by the French Wars of Religion of 1562–98, the Fronde of 1648–52, the French Revolutionary Terror...


From Gutenberg to Google

by Tom Wheeler Brookings Institution Press (January 22, 2019)

Network revolutions of the past have shaped the present and set the stage for the revolution we are experiencing today

In an era of seemingly instant change, it's easy to think that today's revolutions—in communications,...


The Polar Bear Expedition

by James Carl Nelson William Morrow (February 19, 2019)

The extraordinary lost story of America's invasion of Russia 100 years ago

*** In the brutally cold winter of 1919, 5,000 Americans battled the Red Army 600 miles north of Moscow. We have forgotten. Russia...