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Incidental Archaeologists

by Bonnie Effros Cornell University Press (August 15, 2018)

In Incidental Archaeologists, Bonnie Effros examines the archaeological contributions of nineteenth-century French military officers, who, raised on classical accounts of warfare and often trained as cartographers,...


On Roman Religion

by Jorg Rupke Cornell University Press (October 04, 2016)

Was religious practice in ancient Rome cultic and hostile to individual expression? Or was there, rather, considerable latitude for individual initiative and creativity? Jorg Rupke, one of the world's leading...


On Duties

by Marcus Tullius Cicero & Benjamin Patrick Newton Cornell University Press (July 28, 2016)

Benjamin Patrick Newton's translation of Cicero’s On Duties is the most complete edition of a text that has been considered a source of moral authority throughout classical, medieval, and modern times. Marcus...


The care of the dead in late antiquity

by Éric Rebillard, Elizabeth Trapnell Rawlings & Jeanine Routier-Pucci Cornell University Press (May 21, 2009)

In this provocative book Éric Rebillard challenges many long-held assumptions about early Christian burial customs. For decades scholars of early Christianity have argued that the Church owned and operated...


Christians and Their Many Identities in Late Antiquity, North Africa, 200–450 CE

by Éric Rebillard Cornell University Press (October 25, 2012)

For too long, the study of religious life in Late Antiquity has relied on the premise that Jews, pagans, and Christians were largely discrete groups divided by clear markers of belief, ritual, and social practice....


The Space that Remains

by Aaron Pelttari Cornell University Press (September 04, 2014)

When we think of Roman Poetry, the names most likely to come to mind are Vergil, Horace, and Ovid, who flourished during the age of Augustus. The genius of Imperial poets such as Juvenal, Martial, and Statius...


Libanius the Sophist

by Raffaella Cribiore Cornell University Press

Libanius of Antioch was a rhetorician of rare skill and eloquence. So renowned was he in the fourth century that his school of rhetoric in Roman Syria became among the most prestigious in the Eastern Empire....