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Last Men Out

by Bob Drury & Tom Clavin Free Press (May 03, 2011)

A “thrilling narrative of bravery, bravado, and loss” (Kirkus Reviews) that tells the “gripping story of a handful of marines who formed the last body of Americans to leave Saigon on April 30, 1975”...


The Future and Its Enemies

by Virginia Postrel Free Press (May 10, 2011)

Today we have greater wealth, health, opportunity, and choice than at any time in history. Yet a chorus of intellectuals and politicians laments our current condition -- as slaves to technology, coarsened by...


The Prize

Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction 1992

by Daniel Yergin Free Press (April 05, 2011)

Deemed "the best history of oil ever written" by Business Week and with more than 300,000 copies in print, Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power has...


The Measure of All Things

by Ken Alder Free Press (July 29, 2014)

In June 1792, amidst the chaos of the French Revolution, two intrepid astronomers set out in opposite directions on an extraordinary journey. Starting in Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre would make his way...


Bloodlust

by Russell Jacoby Free Press (April 05, 2011)

THROUGHOUT HISTORY AND ACROSS CULTURES, the most common form of violence is that between family members and neighbors or kindred communities—in civil wars writ large and small. From assault to genocide, from...


The Return

by Daniel Treisman Free Press (January 04, 2011)

Russia has long been a source of puzzlement— and sometimes alarm—for Western observers. Since shaking off communism two decades ago, the country has seemed wobbly at best, thoroughly corrupt and threatening...


On the Eve of the Millenium

by Conor Cruise O'brien Free Press (November 01, 1995)

"All my life," writes Conor Cruise O'Brien, "I have been fascinated and puzzled by nationalism and religion; by the interaction of the two forces, sometimes in unison, sometimes antagonistic." In these wide-ranging...


Refighting the Last War

by D. Clayton James Free Press (June 15, 2010)

Distinguished historian D. Clayton James offers a brilliant reinterpretation of the Korean War conflict. Focusing on the critical issue of command, he shows how the Korean War is a key to understanding American...


When the Mississippi Ran Backwards

by Jay Feldman Free Press (March 01, 2005)

From Jay Feldmen comes an enlightening work about how the most powerful earthquakes in the history of America united the Indians in one last desperate rebellion, reversed the Mississippi River, revealed a seamy...


The 188th Crybaby Brigade

by Joel Chasnoff Free Press (February 09, 2010)

Look at me. Do you see me? Do you see me in my olive-green uniform, beret, and shiny black boots? Do you see the assault rifle slung across my chest? Finally! I am the badass Israeli soldier at the side of...


Dogtown

by Elyssa East Free Press (December 01, 2009)

The area known as Dogtown -- an isolated colonial ruin and surrounding 3,000-acre woodland in storied seaside Gloucester, Massachusetts -- has long exerted a powerful influence over artists, writers, eccentrics,...


Worse Than Slavery

by David M. Oshinsky Free Press (June 23, 2008)

In this sensitively told tale of suffering, brutality, and inhumanity, Worse Than Slavery is an epic history of race and punishment in the deepest South from emancipation to the civil rights era—and beyond....


Restoration

by George F. Will Free Press (May 11, 2010)

Biblical Christianity was originally a sect of Judaism that believed in Jesus and revered the Torah as the core of her scriptures. Restoration is a riveting argument for a return to that original biblical expression...


Turn Away Thy Son

by Elizabeth Jacoway Free Press (January 09, 2007)

In September 1957, the nation was transfixed by nine black students attempting to integrate Central High School in Little Rock in the wake of the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision. Governor...


Culture of Hope

by Frederick Turner Free Press (February 01, 1995)

As we approach the new millenium, the moral, intellectual,and spiritual crisis of our time is visible most plainly in the sickness of the arts. The "postmodern" cultural establishment is philosophically empty...


Jefferson's Demons

by Michael Knox Beran Free Press (May 11, 2010)

"I have often wondered for what good end the sensations of Grief could be intended."

-- Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson suffered during his life from periodic bouts of dejection and despair, shadowed intervals...


The Ballad of Little River

by Paul Hemphill Free Press (May 11, 2010)

Except for a massacre of five hundred settlers by renegade Creek Indians in the early 1800s, not much bad had happened during two centuries in Little River, Alabama, an obscure Lost Colony in the swampy woodlands...


The Goddess and the Bull

by Michael Balter Free Press (June 15, 2010)

Thousands of years before the pyramids were built in Egypt and the Trojan War was fought, a great civilization arose on the Anatolian plains. The Goddess and the Bull details the dramatic quest by archaeologists...


The Last Knight

by Norman F. Cantor Free Press (May 11, 2010)

There may not be a more fascinating a historical period than the late fourteenth century in Europe. The Hundred Years' War ravaged the continent, yet gallantry, chivalry, and literary brilliance flourished in...


Values Matter Most

by Ben J. Wattenberg Free Press (May 11, 2010)

Published in tandem with his upcoming PBS special of the same name, the eminent political commentator argues that the parties' stands on social issues such as crime, welfare, and morality will decide future...


St Petersburg

by Solomon Volkov Free Press (June 15, 2010)

The definitive cultural biography of the “Venice of the North” and its transcendent artistic and spiritual legacy, written by Russian emerge and acclaimed cultural historian, Solomon Volkov.

Long considered...


Alexandria

by Theodore Vrettos Free Press (June 15, 2010)

Alexandria was the greatest cultural capital of the ancient world. Accomplished classicist and author Theodore Vrettos now tells its story for the first time in a single volume. His enchanting blend of literary...


Great Pretenders

by Karen Schoemer Free Press (January 31, 2006)

February 1964: The Beatles step onto the tarmac at JFK International Airport and turn the country on its head. It's the advent of rock and roll's uninterrupted reign, youthful rebellion, and overt teenage sex....


C Wright Mills An American Utopia

by Irving Lewis Horowitz Free Press (April 01, 1985)

A biography of legendary sociologist C. Wright Mills, author of The Power Elite and White Collar, among other works, by eminent sociologist Irving L. Horowitz.

Charles Wright Mills (1916-1962) was a famed sociologist,...


Modern Tyrants

by Daniel Chirot Free Press (February 07, 1994)

Along with its much vaunted progress in scientific and economic realms, our century has witnessed the rise of the most brutal and oppressive regimes in the history of mankind. Even with the collapse of Marxism,...


Domestic Revolutions

by Steven Mintz & Susan Kellogg Free Press (April 03, 1989)

An examination of how the concept of “family” has been transformed over the last three centuries in the U.S., from its function as primary social unit to today’s still-evolving model.

Based on a wide reading...


Peddling Peril

by David Albright Free Press (March 16, 2010)

“THE UNLEASHED POWER OF THE ATOM HAS CHANGED EVERYTHING SAVE OUR MODES OF THINKING, AND WE THUS DRIFT TOWARD UNPARALLELED CATASTROPHE.” —ALBERT EINSTEIN

With the revelation of Iran’s secret uranium...


History of American Labor

by Joseph G. Rayback Free Press (June 30, 2008)

Joseph Rayback’s history of the American labor movement.

A compact and comprehensive chronicle of where labor has been and where it is today.


End of History and the Last Man

by Francis Fukuyama Free Press (March 01, 2006)

Ever since its first publication in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man has provoked controversy and debate. Francis Fukuyama's prescient analysis of religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress,...


Embattled Courage

by Gerald Linderman Free Press (June 30, 2008)

Linderman traces each soldier's path from the exhilaration of enlistment to the disillusionment of battle to postwar alienation. He provides a rare glimpse of the personal battle that raged within soldiers then...


Soviet Tragedy

by Martin Malia Free Press (June 30, 2008)

"The Soviet Tragedy is an essential coda to the literature of Soviet studies...Insofar as [he] returns the power of ideology to its central place in Soviet history, Malia has made an enormous contribution. He...


Arguing the World

by Joseph Dorman Free Press (August 15, 2000)

From cafeterias to cocktail parties to the pages of influential journals of opinion, few groups of friends have argued ideas so passionately and so publicly as the writers and critics known as the New York intellectuals....


Near a Thousand Tables

by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto Free Press (June 04, 2002)

In Near a Thousand Tables, acclaimed food historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells the fascinating story of food as cultural as well as culinary history -- a window on the history of mankind.

In this "appetizingly...


A Mind of Its Own

by David M. Friedman Free Press (September 04, 2008)

Whether enemy or ally, demon or god, the source of satisfaction or the root of all earthly troubles, the penis has forced humanity to wrestle with its enduring mysteries. Here, in an enlightening and entertaining...


Arabists

by Robert D. Kaplan Free Press (July 01, 1995)

A tight-knit group closely linked by intermarriage as well as class and old school ties, the “Arabists” were men and women who spent much of their lives living and working in the Arab world as diplomats,...


Monarch

by Robert Lacey Free Press (June 24, 2008)

For more than fifty years, Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor -- who became Elizabeth II, Queen of England on February 6, 1952 -- has been loved and loathed, revered and feared, applauded and criticized by her...


Contributions to L'Année Sociologique

by Emile Durkheim Free Press (June 30, 2008)

These reviews, notices, and introductory sections by a major figure in intellectual history represent more than a decade of effort to define and clarify a new form of scientific investigation. Together, they...


China in Disintegration

by James E. Sheridan Free Press (June 30, 2008)

After the 1911 fall of the Manchus came the most hideous breakdown in Chinese history. Sheridan, a Northwestern University scholar, concentrates on the Kuomintang movement of Chiang Kai-shek, insisting that...


Military in America

by Peter M. Karsten Free Press (August 27, 1986)

In The American Military Tradition historians John M. Carroll and Colin F. Baxter gather an esteemed group of military historians to explore the pivotal issues and themes in American warfare from the Colonial...


Autopsy For An Empire

by Dmitri Volkogonov Free Press (June 18, 2008)

The late Dmitri Volkogonov emerged in the last decade of his life as the preeminent Russian historian of this century. His crowning achievement is the account of the seven General Secretaries of the Soviet Empire...


Silent Night

by Stanley Weintraub Free Press (October 30, 2001)

It was one of history's most powerful -- yet forgotten -- Christmas stories. It took place in the improbable setting of the mud, cold rain and senseless killing of the trenches of World War I. It happened in...


Other Greeks

by Victor Davis Hanson Free Press (June 01, 1995)

Everyone has been taught that the Greek city-state is the ultimate source of the Western tradition in literature, philosophy, and politics. For generations, scholars have focused on the rise of the city-state...


The Intimate World of Abraham Lincoln

by C.A. Tripp & Jean Baker Free Press (January 04, 2005)

The late C. A. Tripp, a highly regarded sex researcher and colleague of Alfred Kinsey, and author of the runaway bestseller The Homosexual Matrix, devoted the last ten years of his life to an exhaustive study...


Reagan's Path to Victory

by Martin Anderson, Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson & George P. Shultz Free Press (December 01, 2004)

In the last years of Ronald Reagan's life, his voluminous writings on politics, policy, and people finally emerged and offered a Rosetta stone by which to understand him. From 1975 to 1979, in particular, he...


The Fourth Part of the World

by Toby Lester Free Press (November 03, 2009)

"Old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, beguiling Waldseemüller world map of 1507." So begins this remarkable story of...


A Hanging Offense

by Buckner Melton Free Press (November 01, 2007)

Mutiny on the Bounty is one of history's greatest naval stories -- yet few know the similar tale from America's own fledgling navy in the dying days of the Age of Sail, a tale of mutiny and death at sea on an...


Revolutionary Career of Maximilien Robespierre

by David P. Jordan Free Press (October 16, 2013)

In changing forever the political landscape of the modern world, the French Revolution was driven by a new personality: the confirmed, self-aware revolutionary. Maximilien Robespierre originated the role, inspiring...


The World within War

by Gerald Linderman Free Press (October 16, 2013)

Gerald Linderman has created a seamless and highly original social history, authoritatively recapturing the full experience of combat in World War II. Drawing on letters and diaries, memoirs and surveys, Linderman...


Up from Conservatism

by Michael Lind Free Press (August 06, 2013)

For nearly a decade, Michael Lind worked closely as a writer and editor with the intellectual leaders of American conservatism. Slowly, he came to believe that the many prominent intellectuals he worked with...


Vietnam: The Necessary War

by Michael Lind Free Press (July 30, 2013)

A quarter century after its end, the Vietnam War still divides Americans. Some, mostly on the left, claim that Indochina was of no strategic value to the United States and was not worth an American war. Others,...