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Film Worlds: A Philosophical Aesthetics of Cinema

by Daniel Yacavone Columbia University Press (December 02, 2014)

Film Worlds unpacks the significance of the “worlds” that narrative films create, offering an innovative perspective on cinema as art. Drawing on aesthetics and the philosophy of art in both the continental...


"It's the Pictures That Got Small": Charles Brackett on Billy Wilder and Hollywood's Golden Age

by Anthony Slide & Jim Moore Columbia University Press (November 25, 2014)

Golden Age Hollywood screenwriter Charles Brackett was an extremely observant and perceptive chronicler of the entertainment industry during its most exciting years. He is best remembered as the writing partner...


Maya Deren: Incomplete Control

by Sarah Keller Columbia University Press (December 09, 2014)

Maya Deren (1917–1961) was a Russian-born American filmmaker, theorist, poet, and photographer working at the forefront of the American avant-garde in the 1940s and 1950s. Influenced by Jean Cocteau and Marcel...


On Slowness: Toward an Aesthetic of the Contemporary

by Lutz Koepnick Columbia University Press (October 07, 2014)

Speed is an obvious facet of contemporary society, whereas slowness has often been dismissed as conservative and antimodern. Challenging a long tradition of thought, Lutz Koepnick instead proposes to understand...


The Orphan of Zhao and Other Yuan Plays: The Earliest Known Versions

by Stephen H. West & Wilt L. Idema Columbia University Press (December 09, 2014)

This is the first anthology of Yuan-dynasty zaju (miscellaneous comedies) to introduce the genre to English-speaking readers exclusively through translations of the plays’ fourteenth-century editions. Almost...


Visions of Dystopia in China's New Historical Novels

by Jeffrey C. Kinkley Columbia University Press (November 04, 2014)

The depiction of personal and collective suffering in modern Chinese novels differs significantly from standard Communist accounts and most Eastern and Western historical narratives. Writers such as Yu Hua,...


Photography and Its Violations

by John Roberts Columbia University Press (September 30, 2014)

Theorists critique photography for “objectifying” its subjects and manipulating appearance for the sake of art. In this bold counterargument, John Roberts recasts photography’s violating powers and aesthetic...


After the Silents: Hollywood Film Music in the Early Sound Era, 1926-1934

by Michael Slowik Columbia University Press (October 07, 2014)

Many believe Max Steiner’s score for King Kong (1933) was the first important attempt at integrating background music into sound film, but a closer look at the industry’s early sound era (1926–1934) reveals...


Deathwatch: American Film, Technology, and the End of Life

by C. Scott Combs Columbia University Press (September 02, 2014)

While cinema is a medium with a unique ability to “watch life” and “write movement,” it is equally singular in its portrayal of death. The first study to unpack American cinema’s long history of representing...


Let the Right One In

by Anne Billson Columbia University Press (December 13, 2011)

Audiences can't get enough of fang fiction. Twilight, True Blood, Being Human, The Vampire Diaries, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Blade, Underworld, and the novels of Anne Rice and Darren Shan—against this glut...


Radical History and the Politics of Art

by Gabriel Rockhill Columbia University Press (July 15, 2014)

Gabriel Rockhill opens new space for rethinking the relationship between art and politics. Rather than understanding the two spheres as separated by an insurmountable divide or linked by a privileged bridge,...


Electric Sounds: Technological Change and the Rise of Corporate Mass Media

by Steve J. Wurtzler Columbia University Press (January 23, 2007)

Electric Sounds brings to vivid life an era when innovations in the production, recording, and transmission of sound revolutionized a number of different media, especially the radio, the phonograph, and the...


Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery: An Essay on Popular Culture

by Eva Illouz Columbia University Press (November 05, 2003)

-- Amy B. Jordan, Director of the Media and the Developing Mind Sector, Annenberg Public Policy Center, University of Pennsylvania


Black & White & Noir: America's Pulp Modernism

by Paula Rabinowitz Columbia University Press (June 20, 2002)

The first book to treat issues of race and ethnicity as related to noir, offering a cultural history of twentieth-century America through episodic readings of films, photographs, and literature.


Stanford White: Decorator in Opulence and Dealer in Antiquities

by Wayne Craven Columbia University Press (May 18, 2005)

The designer of such landmarks as the Washington Square Arch, the New York Herald and Tiffany Buildings, and the homes of captains of American industry, Stanford White is a legendary figure in the history of...


The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama

by Xiaomei Chen Columbia University Press (March 11, 2014)

This condensed anthology reproduces close to a dozen plays from Xiaomei Chen’s well-received original collection, along with her critical introduction to the historical, cultural, and aesthetic evolution of...


Video Revolutions: On the History of a Medium

by Michael Z. Newman Columbia University Press (April 01, 2014)

Since the days of early television, video has been an indispensable part of culture, society, and moving-image media industries. Over the decades, it has been an avant-garde artistic medium, a high-tech consumer...


Lady in the Dark: Iris Barry and the Art of Film

by Robert Sitton Columbia University Press (March 11, 2014)

Iris Barry (1895–1969) was one of the first critics to recognize film as an art form. The mother of film preservation internationally, she founded the film department at New York City's Museum of Modern Art...


New Tunisian Cinema: Allegories of Resistance

by Robert Lang Columbia University Press (March 18, 2014)

Tunisian cinema is often described as the most daring of all Arab cinemas, a model of equipoise between “East” and “West” and the defender of a fierce, sovereign style. Even during the repressive regime...


Continental Strangers: German Exile Cinema, 1933-1951

by Gerd Gemünden Columbia University Press (January 21, 2014)

Hundreds of German-speaking film professionals took refuge in Hollywood during the 1930s and 1940s, making a lasting contribution to American cinema. Hailing from Austria, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine,...


This Place, These People: Life and Shadow on the Great Plains

by David Stark & Nancy Warner Columbia University Press (October 29, 2013)

Nancy Warner’s photographs and David Stark’s interviews and reflections provide fresh perspective on the history and culture of a distinctly American phenomenon. Continuing in the tradition of Solomon D....


Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach

by Philip Kitcher Columbia University Press (November 12, 2013)

Published in 1913, Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice is one of the most widely read novellas in any language. In the 1970s, Benjamin Britten adapted it into an opera, and Luchino Visconti turned it into a successful...


Cut-Pieces: Celluloid Obscenity and Popular Cinema in Bangladesh

by Lotte Hoek Columbia University Press (October 08, 2013)

Imagine watching an action film in a small-town cinema hall in Bangladesh, and in between the gun battles and fistfights, a short pornographic clip appears. This is known as a cut-piece, a strip of locally made...


Home in Hollywood: The Imaginary Geography of Cinema

by Elisabeth Bronfen Columbia University Press (October 08, 2001)

Who can forget Dorothy’s quest for the great and powerful Oz as she tried to return to her beloved Kansas? She thought she needed a wizard’s magic, only to discover that home—and the power to get there—had...


George Gallup in Hollywood

by Susan Ohmer Columbia University Press (November 07, 2006)

George Gallup in Hollywood is a fascinating look at the film industry's use of opinion polling in the 1930s and '40s. George Gallup's polling techniques first achieved fame when he accurately predicted that...


The New European Cinema: Redrawing the Map

by Rosalind Galt Columbia University Press (March 21, 2006)

New European Cinema offers a compelling response to the changing cultural shapes of Europe, charting political, aesthetic, and historical developments through innovative readings of some of the most popular...


Night Passages: Philosophy, Literature, and Film

by Elisabeth Bronfen & David Brenner Columbia University Press (September 10, 2013)

In the beginning was the night. All light, shapes, language, and subjective consciousness, as well as the world and art depicting them, emerged from this formless chaos. In fantasy, we seek to return to this...


NPR: The Trials and Triumphs of National Public Radio

by Michael P. McCauley Columbia University Press (June 14, 2005)

The people who shaped America’s public broadcasting system thought it should be "a civilized voice in a civilized community"—a clear alternative to commercial broadcasting. This book tells the story of how...


The Utopia of Film: Cinema and Its Futures in Godard, Kluge, and Tahimik

by Christopher Pavsek Columbia University Press (January 29, 2013)

The German filmmaker Alexander Kluge has long promoted cinema’s relationship with the goals of human emancipation. Jean-Luc Godard and Filipino director Kidlat Tahimik also believe in cinema’s ability to...


The Frontier Within: Essays by Abe Kobo

by Kobo Abe & Richard Calichman Columbia University Press (June 04, 2013)

Abe Kobo (1924–1993) was one of Japan’s greatest postwar writers, widely recognized for his imaginative science fiction and plays of the absurd. However, he also wrote theoretical criticism for which he is...


Where Film Meets Philosophy: Godard, Resnais, and Experiments in Cinematic Thinking

by Hunter Vaughan Columbia University Press (December 25, 2012)

Closely reading the films of Jean-Luc Godard and Alain Resnais, Hunter Vaughan establishes a connection between phenomenology and image-philosophy to analyze the moving image and its challenge to conventional...


Satyajit Ray on Cinema

by Satyajit Ray, Sandip Ray & Shyam Benegal Columbia University Press (March 05, 2013)

Satyajit Ray, one of the greatest auteurs of twentieth century cinema, was a Bengali motion-picture director, writer, and illustrator who set a new standard for Indian cinema with his Apu Trilogy: Pather Panchali...


Viewers Like You: How Public TV Failed the People

by Laurie Ouellette Columbia University Press (September 17, 2002)

How "public" is public television if only a small percentage of the American people tune in on a regular basis? When public television addresses "viewers like you," just who are you? Despite the current of frustration...


Up from Invisibility: Lesbians, Gay Men, and the Media in America

by Larry Gross Columbia University Press (December 26, 2001)

A half century ago gay men and lesbians were all but invisible in the media and, in turn, popular culture. With the lesbian and gay liberation movement came a profoundly new sense of homosexual community and...


Where Men Hide

by James B. Twitchell & Ken Ross Columbia University Press (March 21, 2006)

"If you ask men if they spend any time hiding, they usually look at you as if you're nuts. 'What, me hide?' But if you ask women whether men hide, they immediately know what you mean." -- from Where Men Hide...


Chaos, Territory, Art: Deleuze and the Framing of the Earth

by Elizabeth Grosz Columbia University Press (May 30, 2008)

Instead of treating art as a unique creation that requires reason and refined taste to appreciate, Elizabeth Grosz argues that art-especially architecture, music, and painting-is born from the disruptive forces...


The Velvet Lounge: On Late Chicago Jazz

by Gerald Majer Columbia University Press (August 24, 2005)

Troubled urban neighborhoods and jazz-club havens were the backdrop of Gerald Majer's life growing up in sixties and seventies Chicago. The Velvet Lounge, an original hybrid of memoir, biography, and musical...


Hollywood and the Culture Elite: How the Movies Became American

by Peter Decherney Columbia University Press (April 06, 2005)

As Americans flocked to the movies during the first part of the twentieth century, the guardians of culture grew worried about their diminishing influence on American art, education, and American identity itself....


The Triangle of Representation

by Christopher Prendergast Columbia University Press (September 26, 2000)

Moving deftly among literary and visual arts, as well as the modern critical canon, Christopher Prendergast's book explores the meaning and value of representation as both a philosophical challenge (What does...


Living It Up: Our Love Affair with Luxury

by James B. Twitchell Columbia University Press (April 03, 2002)

Economic downturns and terrorist attacks notwithstanding, America's love affair with luxury continues unabated. Over the last several years, luxury spending in the United States has been growing four times faster...


Class Act: The Jazz Life of Choreographer Cholly Atkins

by Cholly Atkins & Jacqui Malone Columbia University Press (April 09, 2003)

Cholly Atkins's career has spanned an extraordinary era of American dance. He began performing during Prohibition and continued his apprenticeship in vaudeville, in nightclubs, and in the army during World War...


Experiencing Music Video: Aesthetics and Cultural Context

by Carol Vernallis Columbia University Press (June 16, 2004)

-- Nicholas Cook, Professor of Music, Royal Holloway, University of London, Editor, Journal of the Royal Musical Association


Viewers Like You: How Public TV Failed the People

by Laurie Oullette Columbia University Press (July 24, 2012)

How "public" is public television if only a small percentage of the American people tune in on a regular basis? When public television addresses "viewers like you," just who are you? Despite the current of frustration...


Up from Invisibility: Lesbians, Gay Men, and the Media in America

by Larry Gross Columbia University Press (December 26, 2001)

A half century ago gay men and lesbians were all but invisible in the media and, in turn, popular culture. With the lesbian and gay liberation movement came a profoundly new sense of homosexual community and...


Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film

by Sylvia Li-chun Lin Columbia University Press (November 30, 2007)

In 1945, Taiwan was placed under the administrative control of the Republic of China, and after two years, accusations of corruption and a failing economy sparked a local protest that was brutally quashed by...


The Presidential Debates: Fifty Years of High Risk TV

by Alan Schroeder Columbia University Press (July 03, 2008)

Alan Schroeder's popular history now covers the 2000 Bush-Gore and 2004 Bush-Kerry debates, including innovations in format and press coverage, and adds new research on televised debates since 1960. Schroeder...


Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies

by Robert G. O'Meally, Brent Hayes Edwards & Farah Jasmine Griffin Columbia University Press (June 30, 2004)

Jackson Pollock dancing to the music as he painted; Romare Bearden's stage and costume designs for Alvin Ailey and Dianne McIntyre; Stanley Crouch stirring his high-powered essays in a room where a drumkit stands...


Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan...and Beyond: A Revised and Expanded Edition of the Classic Text

by Robin Wood Columbia University Press (July 10, 2003)

This classic of film criticism, long considered invaluable for its eloquent study of a problematic period in film history, is now substantially updated and revised by the author to include chapters beyond the...


Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity

by James Lastra Columbia University Press (July 18, 2000)

Representational technologies including photography, phonography, and the cinema have helped define modernity itself. Since the nineteenth century, these technologies have challenged our trust of sensory perception,...


Special Effects: Still in Search of Wonder

by Michele Pierson Columbia University Press (May 23, 2002)

Designed to trick the eye and stimulate the imagination, special effects have changed the way we look at films and the worlds created in them. Computer-generated imagery (CGI), as seen in Hollywood blockbusters...