The University of North Carolina Press / Collection : Justice, Power, and Politics

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Poll Power

by Evan Faulkenbury The University of North Carolina Press (April 10, 2019)

Creating and sustaining a social movement costs money. In the early 1960s, after years of grassroots organizing, civil rights activists convinced non-profit foundations to donate in support of voter education...


Caging Borders and Carceral States

by Robert T. Chase The University of North Carolina Press (April 09, 2019)

This volume considers the interconnection of racial oppression in the U.S. South and West, presenting thirteen case studies that explore the ways in which people have been caged and incarcerated, and what these...


Occupied Territory

by Simon Balto The University of North Carolina Press (March 05, 2019)

In July 1919, an explosive race riot forever changed Chicago. For years, black southerners had been leaving the South as part of the Great Migration. Their arrival in Chicago drew the ire and scorn of many local...


Lethal State

by Seth Kotch The University of North Carolina Press (January 10, 2019)

For years, American states have tinkered with the machinery of death, seeking to align capital punishment with evolving social standards and public will. Against this backdrop, North Carolina had long stood...


Freedom Farmers

by Monica M. White & LaDonna Redmond The University of North Carolina Press (November 06, 2018)

In May 1967, internationally renowned activist Fannie Lou Hamer purchased forty acres of land in the Mississippi Delta, launching the Freedom Farms Cooperative (FFC). A community-based rural and economic development...


A Political Education

by Elizabeth Todd-Breland The University of North Carolina Press (October 03, 2018)

In 2012, Chicago's school year began with the city's first teachers' strike in a quarter century and ended with the largest mass closure of public schools in U.S. history. On one side, a union leader and veteran...


Policing Los Angeles

by Max Felker-Kantor The University of North Carolina Press (September 25, 2018)

When the Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts erupted in violent protest in August 1965, the uprising drew strength from decades of pent-up frustration with employment discrimination, residential segregation, and...


From Asylum to Prison

by Anne E. Parsons The University of North Carolina Press (September 25, 2018)

To many, asylums are a relic of a bygone era. State governments took steps between 1950 and 1990 to minimize the involuntary confinement of people in psychiatric hospitals, and many mental health facilities...


The Men of Mobtown

by Adam Malka The University of North Carolina Press (March 22, 2018)

What if racialized mass incarceration is not a perversion of our criminal justice system's liberal ideals, but rather a natural conclusion? Adam C. Malka raises this disturbing possibility through a gripping...


The Criminalization of Black Children

by Tera Eva Agyepong The University of North Carolina Press (March 14, 2018)

In the late nineteenth century, progressive reformers recoiled at the prospect of the justice system punishing children as adults. Advocating that children's inherent innocence warranted fundamentally different...


Racial Taxation

by Camille Walsh The University of North Carolina Press (February 02, 2018)

In the United States, it is quite common to lay claim to the benefits of society by appealing to "taxpayer citizenship--the idea that, as taxpayers, we deserve access to certain social services like a public...


Cuban Revolution in America

by Teishan A. Latner The University of North Carolina Press (January 11, 2018)

When a popular revolution prevailed on America's doorstep in 1959, it provoked the wrath of the American political establishment but fueled intense interest within the multiracial American Left. In this groundbreaking...


Black Firefighters and the FDNY

by David Goldberg The University of North Carolina Press (October 23, 2017)

For many African Americans, getting a public sector job has historically been one of the few paths to the financial stability of the middle class, and in New York City, few such jobs were as sought-after as...


Unjust Deeds

by Jeffrey D. Gonda The University of North Carolina Press (August 26, 2015)

In 1945, six African American families from St. Louis, Detroit, and Washington, D.C., began a desperate fight to keep their homes. Each of them had purchased a property that prohibited the occupancy of African...


Chained in Silence

by Talitha L. LeFlouria The University of North Carolina Press (April 27, 2015)

In 1868, the state of Georgia began to make its rapidly growing population of prisoners available for hire. The resulting convict leasing system ensnared not only men but also African American women, who were...


Captive Nation

by Dan Berger The University of North Carolina Press (November 14, 2014)

In this pathbreaking book, Dan Berger offers a bold reconsideration of twentieth century black activism, the prison system, and the origins of mass incarceration. Throughout the civil rights era, black activists...


Building a Latino Civil Rights Movement

by Sonia Song-Ha Lee The University of North Carolina Press (May 26, 2014)

In the first book-length history of Puerto Rican civil rights in New York City, Sonia Lee traces the rise and fall of an uneasy coalition between Puerto Rican and African American activists from the 1950s through...


Power to the Poor

by Gordon K. Mantler The University of North Carolina Press (February 25, 2013)

The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights...