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The Berlin Wall

by Frederick Taylor Harper Perennial (October 29, 2019)

“This vivid account of the Wall and all that it meant reminds us that symbolism can be double-edged, as a potent emblem of isolation and repression became, in its destruction, an even more powerful totem of...


Multiculturalism in the British Commonwealth

by Richard T. Ashcroft & Mark Bevir University of California Press (June 04, 2019)

At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more.

Multiculturalism...


The Canaris Conspiracy

by Roger Manvell & Heinrich Fraenkel Skyhorse (March 26, 2019)

July 20, 1944. Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg carried a time bomb in a briefcase into a conference with Adolf Hitler. After wedging the briefcase directly in front of Hitler under a table, Stauffenberg took...


Torn Apart

by Ken Wharton The History Press (February 01, 2019)

As the fiftieth anniversary of the Troubles approaches, Ken Wharton takes a thorough look at the start of the Troubles, the precursors and the explosion of violence in 1969 that would last until the Good Friday...


Germany and the Middle East

by Rolf Steininger Berghahn Books (December 01, 2018)

For over a century, the Middle East has weathered seemingly endless conflicts, ensnaring political players from around the world. And perhaps no nation has displayed a greater range of policies toward, and...


Humanitarianism and Media

by Johannes Paulmann Berghahn Books (December 01, 2018)

For as long as humanitarianism has been understood as a distinct human endeavor, mass media have helped to shape its forms, strategies, and contexts, whether mobilizing public sentiment over suffering in distant...


The Last Division

by Ann Tusa & Raymond Seitz Skyhorse (November 13, 2018)

“A brilliant paper chase—an excellent book.”—Library Journal

JFK, Khrushchev, Reagan, and a city divided.

Berlin has played a major role in world politics since the Nazi era and continues to be in the...


The CSCE and the End of the Cold War

by Nicolas Badalassi & Sarah B. Snyder Berghahn Books (November 01, 2018)

Since its inception, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe has faced controversy. Today it is widely regarded as a contributing factor in the end of the Cold War, with some observers even claiming...


From Weimar to Hitler

by Hermann Beck & Larry Eugene Jones Berghahn Books (November 01, 2018)

Though often depicted as a rapid political transformation, the Nazi seizure of power was in fact a slow process, beginning with the appointment of the Papen cabinet in the early summer of 1932 and extending...


Wilderness of Mirrors

by David Martin Skyhorse (September 15, 2018)

At the dawn of the Cold War, the world’s most important intelligence agencies—the Soviet KGB, the American CIA, and the British MI6—appeared to have clear-cut roles and a sense of rising importance in...


Who REALLY Killed Martin Luther King Jr.?

by Phillip F. Nelson Skyhorse (May 01, 2018)

One of the most infamous and devastating assassinations in American history, the murder of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., was also one of the most quickly resolved by authorities: James Earl Ray...


Children of Nazis

by Tania Crasnianski & Molly Grogan Arcade (February 06, 2018)

In 1940, the German sons and daughters of great Nazi dignitaries Himmler, Göring, Hess, Frank, Bormann, Speer, and Mengele were children of privilege at four, five, or ten years old, surrounded by affectionate,...


The Spy Who Changed the World

by Mike Rossiter Skyhorse (November 21, 2017)

The incredible true story of a British physicist who was an undercover spy for the Soviets. The world first heard of Klaus Fuchs, the head of theoretical physics at the British Research Establishment at Harwell...


The Persistence of Race

by Lara Day & Oliver Haag Berghahn Books (October 01, 2017)

Race in 20th-century German history is an inescapable topic, one that has been defined overwhelmingly by the narratives of degeneracy that prefigured the Nuremberg Laws and death camps of the Third Reich. As...


Ruptures in the Everyday

by Andrew Stuart Bergerson, Leonard Schmieding & Atg26 Berghahn Books (July 01, 2017)

During the twentieth century, Germans experienced a long series of major and often violent disruptions in their everyday lives. Such chronic instability and precipitous change made it difficult for them to...


Poland Daily

by Ewa Mazierska Berghahn Books (June 01, 2017)

Like many Eastern European countries, Poland has seen a succession of divergent economic and political regimes over the last century, from prewar "embedded capitalism," through the state socialism of the Soviet...


Daily Life in the Abyss

by Vahé Tachjian Berghahn Books (May 01, 2017)

Historical research into the Armenian Genocide has grown tremendously in recent years, but much of it has focused on large-scale questions related to Ottoman policy or the scope of the killing. Consequently,...


Reluctant Skeptic

by Harry T. Craver Berghahn Books (February 01, 2017)

The journalist and critic Siegfried Kracauer is best remembered today for his investigations of film and other popular media, and for his seminal influence on Frankfurt School thinkers like Theodor Adorno....


Metaphors of Spain

by Javier Moreno-Luzón & Xosé M. Núñez Seixas Berghahn Books (February 01, 2017)

The history of twentieth-century Spanish nationalism is a complex one, placing a set of famously distinctive regional identities against a backdrop of religious conflict, separatist violence, and the autocratic...


Hidden History

by Donald Jeffries & Roger Stone Skyhorse (August 23, 2016)

The US government has spent as much time covering up conspiracies as it has helping the American people. In Hidden History, you will see the amount of effort that our government has dedicated over the past fifty...


Sin, Sex & Subversion

by David Rosen Carrel Books (February 23, 2016)

During the tumultuous 1950s in America, sex was as threatening to the nation’s moral order as communism. New York was the capital of the post–World War II world and the epicenter of a fierce culture war over...


What the Citizen Should Know About Our Arms and Weapons

by James E. Hicks Skyhorse (June 16, 2015)

Originally published in 1941, this book of military ordnance was written in order to bring information to the non-military public during the time of uncertainty that marked the beginnings of the United States’...


Prevail

by Jeff Pearce & Richard Pankhurst Skyhorse (November 18, 2014)

It was the war that changed everything, and yet it’s been mostly forgotten: in 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia. It dominated newspaper headlines and newsreels. It inspired mass marches in Harlem, a play on Broadway,...


Weapons of World War II

by G.M. Barnes Skyhorse (November 11, 2014)

World War II not only marked the end of a terrifying time in Europe, but also the dawning of many technological breakthroughs. In Weapons of World War II, written by the Chief of Research and Engineering Office...


The Vatican Pimpernel

by Brian Fleming Skyhorse (August 01, 2012)

During the German occupation of Rome from 1942–1944, Irishman Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty ran an escape organization for Allied POWs and civilians, including Jews. Safe within the Vatican state, he regularly...


Voices from the Titanic

by Geoff Tibballs Skyhorse (April 01, 2012)

This is the graphic, first-hand story of the maiden voyage and disastrous sinking of the RMS Titanic, told by the survivors themselves. The story of the sinking of the great liner has been told countless times...


Zigzag

by Nicholas Booth Arcade (September 01, 2011)

The most remarkable double agent of World War II, Eddie Chapman was witty, handsome, and charming. Too bad he was also a con man, womanizer, and safe-cracker. To the British, though, he was known as ZigZag,...


1969

by Rob Kirkpatrick Skyhorse (January 24, 2011)

In 1969, man landed on the moon; the “Miracle Mets” captivated sports fans; students took over college campuses and demonstrators battled police; America witnessed the Woodstock music festival; Hollywood...


As Far as My Feet Will Carry Me

by Josef M. Bauer Skyhorse (May 01, 2008)

In 1944, German paratrooper Clemens Forell was captured by the Soviets and sentenced to twenty-five years of labor in a Siberian lead mine. In the Gulags, this was virtually a death sentence. Driven to desperation...