The University of North Carolina Press / Collection : Gender and American Culture / History

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Toward an Intellectual History of Women

by Linda K. Kerber The University of North Carolina Press (December 10, 2017)

As a leading historian of women, Linda K. Kerber has played an instrumental role in the radical rethinking of American history over the past two decades. The maturation and increasing complexity of studies in...


Ladies, Women, and Wenches

by Jane H. Pease & William H. Pease The University of North Carolina Press (October 01, 2017)

Pursuing the meaning of gender in nineteenth-century urban American society, Ladies, Women, and Wenches compares the lives of women living in two distinctive antebellum cultures, Charleston and Boston, between...


Community of Suffering and Struggle

by Elizabeth Faue The University of North Carolina Press (August 01, 2016)

Elizabeth Faue traces the transformation of the American labor movement from community forms of solidarity to bureaucratic unionism. Arguing that gender is central to understanding this shift, Faue explores...


Unruly Women

by Victoria E. Bynum The University of North Carolina Press (August 01, 2016)

In this richly detailed and imaginatively researched study, Victoria Bynum investigates "unruly" women in central North Carolina before and during the Civil War. Analyzing the complex and interrelated impact...


Bad Girls

by Amanda H. Littauer The University of North Carolina Press (July 17, 2015)

In this innovative and revealing study of midcentury American sex and culture, Amanda Littauer traces the origins of the "sexual revolution" of the 1960s. She argues that sexual liberation was much more than...


The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

by Corinne T. Field The University of North Carolina Press (September 02, 2014)

In the fight for equality, early feminists often cited the infantilization of women and men of color as a method used to keep them out of power. Corinne T. Field argues that attaining adulthood--and the associated...


The Myth of Seneca Falls

by Lisa Tetrault The University of North Carolina Press (June 15, 2014)

The story of how the women's rights movement began at the Seneca Falls convention of 1848 is a cherished American myth. The standard account credits founders such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony,...


Searching for Scientific Womanpower

by Laura Micheletti Puaca The University of North Carolina Press (June 02, 2014)

This compelling history of what Laura Micheletti Puaca terms "technocratic feminism" traces contemporary feminist interest in science to the World War II and early Cold War years. During a period when anxiety...


Island Queens and Mission Wives

by Jennifer Thigpen The University of North Carolina Press (March 24, 2014)

In the late eighteenth century, Hawai'i's ruling elite employed sophisticated methods for resisting foreign intrusion. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, American missionaries had gained a foothold in the...


The Secret Eye

by Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas The University of North Carolina Press (March 19, 2014)

The journal of Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, spanning the years from 1848 to 1889, is rare for its treatment of both the Civil War and postbellum years and for its candor and detail in treating these eras. Thomas,...


Radical Relations

by Daniel Winunwe Rivers The University of North Carolina Press (September 03, 2013)

In Radical Relations, Daniel Winunwe Rivers offers a previously untold story of the American family: the first history of lesbian and gay parents and their children in the United States. Beginning in the postwar...


Southern History across the Color Line

by Nell Irvin Painter The University of North Carolina Press (June 01, 2013)

The color line, once all too solid in southern public life, still exists in the study of southern history. As distinguished historian Nell Irvin Painter notes, historians often still write about the South as...


Gender and Jim Crow

by Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore The University of North Carolina Press (April 01, 2013)

Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics...


Remaking Respectability

by Victoria W. Wolcott The University of North Carolina Press (January 01, 2013)

In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved...


Forging Freedom

by Amrita Chakrabarti Myers The University of North Carolina Press (November 14, 2011)

For black women in antebellum Charleston, freedom was not a static legal category but a fragile and contingent experience. In this deeply researched social history, Amrita Chakrabarti Myers analyzes the ways...


The Politics of Fashion in Eighteenth-Century America

by Kate Haulman The University of North Carolina Press (August 01, 2011)

In eighteenth-century America, fashion served as a site of contests over various forms of gendered power. Here, Kate Haulman explores how and why fashion--both as a concept and as the changing style of personal...


Conceiving the Future

by Laura L. Lovett The University of North Carolina Press (November 30, 2009)

Through nostalgic idealizations of motherhood, family, and the home, influential leaders in early twentieth-century America constructed and legitimated a range of reforms that promoted human reproduction. Their...


Before Jim Crow

by Jane Dailey The University of North Carolina Press (November 30, 2009)

Long before the Montgomery bus boycott ushered in the modern civil rights movement, black and white southerners struggled to forge interracial democracy in America. This innovative book examines the most successful...


Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware

by Anne Firor Scott The University of North Carolina Press (September 15, 2009)

In 1942 Pauli Murray, a young black woman from North Carolina studying law at Howard University, visited a constitutional law class taught by Caroline Ware, one of the nation's leading historians. A friendship...


Terror in the Heart of Freedom

by Hannah Rosen The University of North Carolina Press (June 01, 2009)

The meaning of race in the antebellum southern United States was anchored in the racial exclusivity of slavery (coded as black) and full citizenship (coded as white as well as male). These traditional definitions...


The Company He Keeps

by Nicholas L. Syrett The University of North Carolina Press (March 01, 2009)

Tracing the full history of traditionally white college fraternities in America from their days in antebellum all-male schools to the sprawling modern-day college campus, Nicholas Syrett reveals how fraternity...


Good Girls, Good Food, Good Fun

by Meghan K. Winchell The University of North Carolina Press (December 07, 2008)

Throughout World War II, when Saturday nights came around, servicemen and hostesses happily forgot the war for a little while as they danced together in USO clubs, which served as havens of stability in a time...


Wives without Husbands

by Anna R. Igra The University of North Carolina Press (September 06, 2007)

Shedding new light on contemporary campaigns to encourage marriage among welfare recipients and to prosecute "deadbeat dads," Wives without Husbands traces the efforts of Progressive reformers to make "runaway...


Making Home Work

by Jane E. Simonsen The University of North Carolina Press (December 08, 2006)

During the westward expansion of America, white middle-class ideals of home and domestic work were used to measure differences between white and Native American women. Yet the vision of America as "home" was...


Feminism, Sexuality, and Politics

by Estelle B. Freedman The University of North Carolina Press (December 08, 2006)

One of a small group of feminist pioneers in the historical profession, Estelle B. Freedman teaches and writes about women's history with a passion informed by her feminist values. Over the past thirty years,...


Women and Patriotism in Jim Crow America

by Francesca Morgan The University of North Carolina Press (May 18, 2006)

After the Civil War, many Americans did not identify strongly with the concept of a united nation. Francesca Morgan finds the first stirrings of a sense of national patriotism--of "these United States--in the...


Home on the Rails

by Amy G. Richter The University of North Carolina Press (March 13, 2006)

Recognizing the railroad's importance as both symbol and experience in Victorian America, Amy G. Richter follows women travelers onto trains and considers the consequences of their presence there.

For a time,...


Relative Intimacy

by Rachel Devlin The University of North Carolina Press (March 08, 2006)

Celebrated as new consumers and condemned for their growing delinquencies, teenage girls emerged as one of the most visible segments of American society during and after World War II. Contrary to the generally...


The Freedom of the Streets

by Sharon E. Wood The University of North Carolina Press (March 08, 2006)

Gilded Age cities offered extraordinary opportunities to women--but at a price. As clerks, factory hands, and professionals flocked downtown to earn a living, they alarmed social critics and city fathers, who...


From Welfare to Workfare

by Jennifer Mittelstadt The University of North Carolina Press (March 08, 2006)

In 1996, Democratic president Bill Clinton and the Republican-controlled Congress "ended welfare as we know it" and trumpeted "workfare" as a dramatic break from the past. But, in fact, workfare was not new....


Masterful Women

by Kirsten E. Wood The University of North Carolina Press (December 15, 2005)

Many early-nineteenth-century slaveholders considered themselves "masters" not only over slaves, but also over the institutions of marriage and family. According to many historians, the privilege of mastery...


Manliness and Its Discontents

by Martin Summers The University of North Carolina Press (December 15, 2005)

In a pathbreaking new assessment of the shaping of black male identity in the early twentieth century, Martin Summers explores how middle-class African American and African Caribbean immigrant men constructed...


Closer to Freedom

by Stephanie M. H. Camp The University of North Carolina Press (October 12, 2005)

Recent scholarship on slavery has explored the lives of enslaved people beyond the watchful eye of their masters. Building on this work and the study of space, social relations, gender, and power in the Old...


Women and the Historical Enterprise in America: Gender, Race and the Politics of Memory

by Julie Des Jardins The University of North Carolina Press (July 21, 2004)

In Women and the Historical Enterprise in America, Julie Des Jardins explores American women's participation in the practice of history from the late nineteenth century through the end of World War II, a period...


Taking Haiti

by Mary A. Renda The University of North Carolina Press (July 21, 2004)

The U.S. invasion of Haiti in July 1915 marked the start of a military occupation that lasted for nineteen years--and fed an American fascination with Haiti that flourished even longer. Exploring the cultural...


Signatures of Citizenship

by Susan Zaeske The University of North Carolina Press (December 04, 2003)

In this comprehensive history of women's antislavery petitions addressed to Congress, Susan Zaeske argues that by petitioning, women not only contributed significantly to the movement to abolish slavery but...


Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement

by Barbara Ransby The University of North Carolina Press (November 20, 2003)

One of the most important African American leaders of the twentieth century and perhaps the most influential woman in the civil rights movement, Ella Baker (1903-1986) was an activist whose remarkable career...


Free Hearts and Free Homes

by Michael D. Pierson The University of North Carolina Press (November 20, 2003)

By exploring the intersection of gender and politics in the antebellum North, Michael Pierson examines how antislavery political parties capitalized on the emerging family practices and ideologies that accompanied...


The Veiled Garvey

by Ula Yvette Taylor The University of North Carolina Press (October 16, 2003)

In this biography, Ula Taylor explores the life and ideas of one of the most important, if largely unsung, Pan-African freedom fighters of the twentieth century: Amy Jacques Garvey (1895-1973).

Born in Jamaica,...


Civilizing Capitalism

by Landon R. Y. Storrs The University of North Carolina Press (July 11, 2003)

Offering fresh insights into the history of labor policy, the New Deal, feminism, and southern politics, Landon Storrs examines the New Deal era of the National Consumers' League, one of the most influential...


Ida B. Wells-Barnett and American Reform, 1880-1930

by Patricia A. Schechter The University of North Carolina Press (January 14, 2003)

Pioneering African American journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) is widely remembered for her courageous antilynching crusade in the 1890s; the full range of her struggles against injustice is not as...


U.S. History As Women's History

by Linda K. Kerber, Alice Kessler-Harris & Kathryn Kish Sklar The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

This outstanding collection of fifteen original essays represents innovative work by some of the most influential scholars in the field of women's history. Covering a broad sweep of history from colonial to...


We Mean to Be Counted

by Elizabeth R. Varon The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Over the past two decades, historians have successfully disputed

the notion that American women remained wholly outside the realm of politics until the early twentieth century. Still, a consensus has prevailed...


Delinquent Daughters

by Mary E. Odem The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Delinquent Daughters explores the gender, class, and racial tensions that fueled campaigns to control female sexuality in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America. Mary Odem looks at these moral...


Entitled to Power

by Katherine Jellison The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

The advent of modern agribusiness irrevocably changed the patterns of life and labor on the American family farm. In Entitled to Power, Katherine Jellison examines midwestern farm women's unexpected response...


Sex and Citizenship in Antebellum America

by Nancy Isenberg The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

With this book, Nancy Isenberg illuminates the origins of the women's rights movement. Rather than herald the singular achievements of the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, she examines the confluence of events...


Within the Plantation Household

by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing...


Doing Literary Business

by Susan Coultrap-McQuin The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Coultrap-McQuin investigates the reasons for women's unprecedented literary professionalism in the nineteenth century, highlighting the experiences of E.D.E.N. Southworth, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Gail Hamilton,...


Strangers and Pilgrims

by Catherine A. Brekus The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Margaret Meuse Clay, who barely escaped a public whipping in the 1760s for preaching without a license; "Old Elizabeth," an ex-slave who courageously traveled to the South to preach against slavery in the early...