Zero K: A Novel

Editorial reviews

Zero K: A Novel

So precarious do our lives feel against the never-ending nightmare of 24-hour news, so wedded are we to the idea that we can bend the world to our wishes, and so burdened have we become to consume so much in just 80-some years, we are now unable to think sensibly about the reality that it’s quite natural for us to one day die.

Zero K is DeLillo, and literature, and life, in reverse – a plot that originates in death and moves, with sly, subtle triumph, ever life-ward.

DeLillo has written a handful of the past half-century’s finest novels. Now, as he approaches 80, he gives us one more, written distinctly for the 21st.

Once the novel shakes off its labored start, “Zero K” reminds us of Mr. DeLillo’s almost Day-Glo powers as a writer and his understanding of the strange, contorted shapes that eternal human concerns (with mortality and time) can take in the new millennium.

“Zero K” reminds us of Mr. DeLillo’s almost Day-Glo powers as a writer and his understanding of the strange, contorted shapes that eternal human concerns (with mortality and time) can take in the new millennium.